Student Blog Contest 2015-2016

Today we’re featuring a guest post from Middle Schooler Jocelyn who shares how the Ignition – Digital Literacy & Responsibility course taught her how technology works and how to use it responsibly. Congrats to Jocelyn for being one of our student blog contest winners!

Student: Jocelyn C.
Teacher: Alice Toler
School: Mary Potter Middle
State: North Carolina
Sponsor: National Hockey League (NHL), National Hockey League Players’ Association (NHLPA), Charlotte Hurricanes

There are many ways in which Ignition has positively impacted my life. Thanks to Ignition, I now know that there are ways in which I can help prevent someone from doing something bad using technology. I also know that even the smallest joke can be considered cyberbullying and that is a very bad thing to do. Another thing I learned was that I can prevent myself from being involved in fraud or spams by simply knowing what an authentic email looks like compared to a fake one. I also learned that I don’t have to go with default settings and, when creating an account on the internet, the less information I put, the safer I am. I also learned that there are ways to know whether an internet site is safe or not. Thanks to EverFi I know how to buy a computer depending on my needs. The information that EverFi has provided for me has changed the way in which I navigate the internet and how I use technology because now I know how to be safe and use technology in a good way. The lessons in EverFi will help me in the future because no matter what job I have I will probably use the internet and will know how to navigate it properly. EverFi has really helped me be better with how I use technology.

To learn more about Ignition – Digital Literacy & Responsibility, visit: http://everfi.com/k12/ignition/

Student Blog Contest 2015-2016

Today we’re featuring a guest post from Middle Schooler Destinee who shares how the Ignition – Digital Literacy & Responsibility  course taught her how technology works and how to use it responsibly to help her meet her goals. Congrats to Destinee for being one of our student blog contest winners!

Student: Destinee T
Teacher: Minnie Abdu
School: Bailey APAC Middle School
State: Mississipi
Sponsor: Community Foundation of Nothwest Mississippi

The world is at a time when technology is becoming bigger and bigger. It’s exciting and a little frighting to see where technology will take us. EverFi was an engaging and really fun program for teaching me what I can do now. I was always interested in technology and EverFi gave me ideas about how to become better at using it. Ignition taught me how to plan and monitor my internet and texting use and the consequences for spending too much time online. This has helped me a lot because I used to spend too much time on the internet and I wanted to stop but didn’t know how. Ignition helped me get a plan to use the web more responsibly. I want to be a writer when I grow up and I’ve been wanting to start a blog. Ignition gave me a few ideas of what to do. It also taught me what I can’t post online because of copyright and reminded me not to be a cyberbully. I also learned what to do if I am cyber bullied myself. Overall, I’m really glad my teacher assigned EverFi Ignition to use and it’s one of the most fun things I’ve done in my ICT class so far. As technology continues to develop I will use what I learned from EverFi Ignition to keep me up to date and safe.

To learn more about Ignition – Digital Literacy & Responsibility, visit: http://everfi.com/k12/ignition/

Digital Learning Day is Here!

At EverFi, we are so grateful to all of the educators out there currently using technology in the classroom in an innovative way. Using one of our engaging critical skills courses is a great way to get started if you are not already getting digital in the classroom!

We have some compelling resources on a wide variety of topics including STEM readiness, Financial Education, Diversity & Inclusion, Career Leadership & Success, and Health & Wellness.

If you are already familiar with EverFi courses, today is the perfect day to choose one online learning module for your students to complete. Once you do this, add your name and event to the national map on the Digital Learning Day website. Here are some of our favorite modules to use:

Vault – Understanding Money™
Module 3: Making Plans with Money
Needs v. Wants
Whether it’s food, rent, or Internet, every household has many expenses they must cover. In this activity, students explore the difference between needs and wants, and learn the importance of opportunity cost.

Future Goals – Hockey Scholar™
Module 5: The Pass
Exploring Angles & Reflection
The right angle makes all the difference between victory and defeat. Every bank pass is a lesson in the law of reflection. In this module students learn to measure angles in the real-world setting of a hockey game.

306 – African-American History™
Module 8: Tuskegee Institute
Tuskegee Institute
Your students become journalists as they interview Booker T. Washington about his life and accomplishments. They choose the questions to ask, and are rewarded by hearing Mr. Washington respond using his own historically-accurate words and voice.

We hope you and your students enjoy these resources and have an awesome digital learning day! If you need to get set up with one of these courses, simply visit everfi.com/login and Register.

digital_learning_day_square1

How Effective Are Your Campus Sexual Assault Prevention Efforts?

The voices of survivors and student activists are demanding accountability from college campuses to combat sexual violence. Unprecedented action has been taken by the federal government to ramp up regulations and crack down on schools falling short of their responsibilities to protect and support students. As the result of a predominant focus on compliance with response-related mandates, there continues to be a lack of widespread articulation, understanding, and application of “best practice” for prevention.

When asked to describe their prevention efforts, campus administrators tend to default to listing out the programs they offer to students. This list varies from campus to campus in terms of the number of programs, the timing and target audience, and the underlying evidence-base for each. Regardless of the programmatic variance across institutions, however, an exclusive focus on programs is a myopic approach to prevention. Programming, while critically important, relies on a foundation of institutional commitment to wellness and prevention and engagement in critical processes necessary for doing effective prevention work.

Drawing from key theoretical frameworks and expert analysis gleaned from published literature, EverFi developed a comprehensive and broadly applicable model for approaching prevention as a process, not a program. This model consists of three tiers: programming, critical processes, and institutionalization. Across these tiers are 22 categories of recommendations, resulting from a qualitative coding of over 300 key findings elucidated from dozens of publications on sexual assault prevention.

A Best Practice Framework for Sexual Assault Prevention

sexual assault prevention model

This framework, while useful as a conceptual model, was truly brought to life in April 2015. In collaboration with leading researchers and nationwide prevention professionals, the recommendations were translated into EverFi’s Sexual Assault Diagnostic Inventory, a comprehensive assessment tool measuring campus prevention efforts across the three pillars of programming, critical processes, and institutionalization.

The Sexual Assault Diagnostic Inventory includes over 80 questions aimed at holistically examining a campus’s prevention approach. The tool begins with a number of demographic questions used for benchmarking and analysis. These include questions about the size of the institution, geographic location, religious affiliation, athletic division, public/private status, and number of graduates and undergraduates. The next set of questions examines prevention programming, focusing on the specific populations reached, frequency of programs, approaches utilized, diversity of educators, etc. The tool then looks at a set of processes deemed critical for effective prevention work, including training of educators, tracking of participation, reliance on theory and evidence, degree of evaluation, and strategic planning efforts. The last set of questions look at the degree of institutionalization around prevention, with questions assessing the number of full-time prevention employees, prevention budget, number of times a school’s senior leaders (President, Chancellor, VPSA, etc.) have publicly communicated about the issue, and the presence, frequency, and degree of progress of a prevention task force.

With over a year of pilot data, EverFi recently published a report detailing some groundbreaking findings about the state of prevention in higher education, including:

  • Sexual assault’s impact on retention, academic success, and more
  • Reporting of sexual assault, and student perceptions of institutional response
  • The type of programs schools are utilizing the most and least, and the degree to which these programs are research- or evidence-based
  • Engagement in strategic planning and goal-setting initiatives (or, lack thereof)
  • National trends around prevention funding and staffing, broken down by school type and size

These findings will help campuses identify areas for growth and improvement, but will also highlight the great work they are already doing to support and protect students. With comprehensive insights on their needs and strengths, campuses can truly make transformative impact in addressing sexual violence and creating safer, healthier communities.

To learn more about the Sexual Assault Diagnostic Inventory, and sexual assault prevention best practices, download our new guidebook entitled, “Improving Campus Sexual Assault Prevention: A Best Practice Guide for Administrative Leadership“.

Student Blog Contest 2015-2016

Today we’re featuring a guest post from 8th Grader Shanza who shares how the Future Goals – Hockey Scholar™ course taught her math and science skills through real-life scenarios. Congrats to Shanza for being one of our student blog contest winners!

Student: Shanza A.
Teacher: David Lai
School: Thomas Johnson Middle School
State: Maryland
Sponsor: NHL, NHLPA, and the Washington Capitals


Hockey may seem like a simple and effortless sport to play, but Hockey Scholar taught me that there is more to hockey than it seems. In hockey, players have personal preferences. From the type of blade on their skate, to the weight of their equipment, no player will skate the same. Every split second decision a player makes will dictate how they play, like the way a player holds their stick to the weight of their equipment. As insignificant as one thing may seem, the more important the effect. Before all I knew about skates was that there are different sizes available and that you could sharpen them. One thing I learned that has a major impact on the way players skate is the radius of hollow. The way the players’ skate blades are sharpened changes their hollow, which affects how much of the blade digs into the ice. Skates with a deeper hollow can make sharper turns. Skates with a shallow hollow allow players to skate on top of the ice and move sideways on the ice. Goalies tend to have shallower hollows to help them move side to side. My favorite activity from the course was Game 3: Speed- Math (Advanced). This was because it mainly discussed one of my favorite things to learn about, speed. I find everything about speed intriguing and I learned more about it while taking the Hockey Scholar course. A lot of math goes into finding and learning about speed. For example, the activities in this particular game asked you to calculate the player’s speed in meters per second for both the long and short sprint. I love math, so this activity and course was very fun to do!
 

To learn more about Hockey Scholar, visit: http://everfi.com/k12/hockeyscholar/

Blog Contest

EverFi and BB&T Congratulate Winners of the 2015-2016 BB&T Student Blog Contest

This past fall, EverFi proudly partnered with BB&T to launch a student blog contest to teachers and students across more than 800 high schools that use the BB&T Financial Foundations program in their classrooms. After students completed the financial education course, they had the opportunity to download and play BB&T’s web-based leadership app, LEGACY: A BB&T Leadership Challenge, and were invited to write a short essay on what leadership means to them.

BB&T Associate Cindi Shaddix presents winning student Tytiana with her award.

BB&T Associate Cindi Shaddix presents winning student Tytiana with her award.

We are pleased to announce the winners of this year’s blog contest! These four students demonstrated a deep understanding of what leadership means to them, and their thoughtful essays inspired all of us.

Tytiana, a student at Elite Scholars Academy in Georgia, shared her views on what it means to be an effective leader:

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, then you are a good leader. In the minds of some, being a leader is mainly focused on power, will, and fear. However through the LEGACY game I have learned that being a leader is a goal for the common man or woman who seeks change. Leaders have to be relatable to others. Being an effective leader is about learning to understand, having the patience to succeed, and being able to make the best decisions possible for you and others around you.”

Caleb, a student at Pasquotank County High School in North Carolina, shared his realization that leadership comes in a wide variety of forms:

Caleb, a student at Pasquotank County High School, receives his award

Caleb, a student at Pasquotank County High School, receives his award

“There are two sides of a good leader. There is a mental side and a social side. Before playing LEGACY: A Leadership Challenge, I tended to just focus toward the mental side. This means doing anything that they can to get the job done, hoping for a better future, repeating your good habits and eliminating your old. The mental side is very important. But the social side is just as important. To be a good leader, you must be able to communicate with people effectively. This is what I had to do in LEGACY. I had to communicate with the other characters in a kind yet straightforward way. This is what my father, the leader I look up to in my life, does very well. He was a worker at Lowes. He rarely took days off. He was a very social person. Customers tended to wait the extra minute or two just to be served by my dad, something that my whole family is very proud of. My father’s salary was diminutive compared to many other people in society, but he loved his job. That’s what put him above his counterparts. That’s what puts society’s great leaders above the rest. Their drive. Their willingness to work for what they want. That’s where I want to be.”

Lola, a student at Veterans High School in Georgia, wrote about how the LEGACY game expanded her view on what it means to be an effective leader:

Teacher Dana Burress alongside winning student Lola at Veterans High School

Teacher Dana Burress alongside winning student Lola at Veterans High School.

“My previous idea of a leader was a person who could wield authority; something like an army sergeant. While authority is a good leadership trait, another commonly overlooked trait a of good leader is tact. People are brought up with their own beliefs and ideas of right and wrong. To be an effective leader, one has to go about the right way of introducing your followers to another way of seeing or doing things — without demeaning what they already know. Being a leader is about so much more than possessing authority; it’s about using your influence to help better others. I can only be grateful that this has been brought to my attention early in life, giving me the opportunity to grow in this area and share my newfound knowledge with others.”

Eric, a student at West Forsyth High School in North Carolina, cited an example of a leader in his life who has inspired him:

“Leadership is a defining quality of an individual. A great leader incorporates a multitude of qualities such as being trustworthy, engaged, and empowering while consistently maintaining a positive outlook under intense stress and against all odds. I learned important leadership qualities over this year’s Academy of Finance summer internship from my mentor, Angus Reid. Everyday Mr. Reid organizes and communicates effectively with different clients, tenants, and workers in an elevated sense of respect, positivity, and initiative. His ability to adapt to each individual’s needs and respectfully delegate tasks make him a fantastic leader.”

Congratulations again to our four winners, who each received a $500 gift card. You all have a bright future ahead of you! And many thanks to the dedicated teachers who submitted these winning essays on behalf of their students.