5 Tips to Reach Millennials Through Financial Education

Financial institutions are realizing that they must embrace innovative methods to engage with their audiences—and nowhere is this more true than with the millennial generation. As a demographic that is both less likely to seek professional financial advice and more likely to score low on financial literacy tests, providing millennials with technological options for receiving financial education—anytime, anywhere—is becoming a critical way for financial institutions to connect with this critical audience.

5 Tips to Connect With Millennials Through Financial Educuation

Download our report Reaching Millennial Consumers: Using Financial Education as Content Marketing

Here are five tips for connecting with millennials through financial education:  

Keep it short

Long lectures and lengthy programs aren’t likely to capture short attention spans. Leave it quick and to the point.

Make it relevant

Don’t bombard your audiences with information that isn’t relevant to their current stage of life. Instead, target current needs, like building credit and starting savings accounts.

Embrace mobile

For the generation that grew up with cell phones, if something’s not available on mobile, it might as well not exist. Optimizing education programs for mobile devices means that millennials can learn anytime, anywhere—whether commuting on the subway or standing in line at the grocery store.

Be authentic

Millennials value authentic interactions and are more likely to spot disingenuous intentions and “salesy” tactics. Here’s the good news: they’re also more likely to act as brand ambassadors for companies and organizations they believe in. Be informative and helpful—not solicitous—and you’ll be building a customer for life.

Don’t push

Since millennials tend to be marketing-savvy, be careful with how much you attempt to push or upsell early on. Rather than attempting to sell to them outright, allow your informative content to earn their trust, and then target only the most relevant offerings to them.

Research shows the millennial generation to be bright, open, and eager to expand its financial capability. When done well, financial education programs can connect with millennials and build lasting relationships.

To learn more about using financial education as a method of content marketing, download our report Reaching Millennial Consumers: Using Financial Education as Content Marketing.

Tom Davidson

Why an Entrepreneurial Mindset Matters: The Power of Teaching Innovation and Entrepreneurial Thinking

In 2012, President Obama declared that November is National Entrepreneurship Month, “a time when we celebrate the remarkable and everyday success of our entrepreneurs and innovators, and we reaffirm our commitment to ensuring our economy remains the engine and the envy of the world.”

This month’s celebration goes beyond those individuals who have started successful companies. It extends to those who embrace the entrepreneurial mindset that helps even the most established companies grow and thrive. A recent Accenture study revealed that more than 90% of executives believe long-term success of their organization’s strategy depends on their ability to develop new ideas. Simultaneously, one in three employers say they are looking for entrepreneurial experience, underscoring the need for youth who are equipped to recognize opportunity, take initiative, and innovate in the face of challenges. However, a survey conducted by EverFi found that fewer than half of students feel prepared to identify a business opportunity or recognize the characteristics that make an entrepreneur.

Historically, entrepreneurship has been thought of as a cut-and-dried skill that a person has or doesn’t have. But EverFi and the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE) believe that teaching an entrepreneurial mindset is possible.

Power of Teaching Innovation in Schools

In 2014, EverFi partnered with NFTE to create Venture, a 3-4 hour web-based course that equips students with basic business and entrepreneurial skills. Students build their own simulated food truck business and learn how to assess risk, see opportunities, and develop a business idea. Along the way, they’ll be introduced to entrepreneurs to get real-life perspective. The course is implemented on a co-curricular basis in classrooms across the country, empowering them to find their inner entrepreneur as part of the school day. Data collected from students who completed the Venture program revealed a 40% increase in students feeling prepared with the skills to think and act like an entrepreneur after participating in the program.

“In today’s innovation economy, the entrepreneurial mindset is more important than ever no matter the path a student chooses in life,” noted Dan Delany, NFTE’s Chief Strategy Officer. “NFTE Venture is a great program that helps thousands of students to start their entrepreneurial journey.”

Founded in 1987, NFTE’s mission is to inspire young people from low-income areas to stay in school, to recognize business opportunities, and to plan for successful futures. NFTE has worked with more than 700,000 students in programs across the U.S. and around the world. Evaluation of NFTE’s intensive classroom programs finds meaningful growth in students on opportunity recognition, critical thinking, problem solving and future orientation. Over 90% of students in NFTE programs feel that the program gives them skills that will help them succeed in school and life.

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Throughout National Entrepreneurship Month, EverFi will be posting stories like these about the impact of entrepreneurship education under the hashtag #NEM2016.

If you’re interested in learning more about NFTE Venture, contact Jim@everfi.com

Laying the Groundwork for Financial Capability

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) recently released a comprehensive report outlining a new teaching framework for educators and organizations to utilize as they create programs around building up youth financial capability. Many of the recommendations included in the report are considered education best practice and have long been a part of EverFi’s curriculum development model. Statistics from a recent EverFi study reveal that 9 out of 10 parents talk to their kids about personal finances, but only 43% of those parents feel prepared to do so, and that 66% of millennials cannot answer basic financial wellness questions. As such, the CFPB’s recommendations represent a monumental opportunity to impact change.

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Download Our Guide to Understanding Family Financial Capability

At EverFi, we have always operated from the belief that our goal is to shape financial habits and norms while also building financial knowledge and decision-making skills. Together these goals have been two of the most important and longstanding levers used to influence financial capability. Our elementary, middle, and high school courses use many of CFPB’s recommended teaching techniques to introduce and reinforce these important concepts. From simulation to personalized learning and gamification, our courses strive to engage and empower students to become financially capable adults.

While the CFPB also stresses executive function as an important building block to help youth achieve financial capability, we have learned at EverFi that this is not often something that can be influenced by supplemental programming. It’s true that executive functioning is a prerequisite to success in financial well-being, as it is in every domain of life; however, it is best developed through supportive and nurturing environments and positive socialization. To truly build executive function requires year-round programming that is integrated into multiple areas of the curriculum and a child’s home environment.130603_cfpb_mahaskey_605

The CFPB’s report also highlights the central role that parents and caregivers play in developing youth financial knowledge, attitudes, and decision-making abilities. Through both direct instruction and modeling healthy financial behavior, parents and caregivers can help children develop responsible habits when it comes to spending and saving.

EverFi is committed to providing adult learners with foundational financial knowledge. Our adult course is built on the same core pedagogical foundation as our K-12 offering, but has been adapted to the more complex needs of an adult learner.  It provides adult learners with personalized and interactive learning to drive behavior change. Strengthening the financial knowledge of adults in turn creates home and community environments that help students build healthy financial attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. This report validates EverFi’s future plan to develop a program specifically designed to help parents or caregivers speak with their children about finances, thus improving the executive function deemed important for youth financial capability.

Now is a pivotal time for financial institutions, government organizations, and technology companies to partner and empower teachers, parents and caregivers with the knowledge they need to develop students of all ages into financially responsible adults. We at EverFi are thrilled to share the CFPB’s commitment to this goal and look forward to our continued partnering with organizations to help achieve its recommendations.

Zach Wagner, Vice President, K-12 Content and Product Development
Julia McCombs, Vice President, Adult Content and Product Development

Need Help Channeling Student Activism? – Ten Strategies for Sexual Assault Awareness Month

The arrival of April also brings the arrival of Sexual Assault Awareness Month – a time in which many colleges and universities ramp up their prevention efforts with a vast array of programs geared towards this important issue. Students are often on the front lines of organizing events, generating dialogue, and demonstrating a personal commitment to raising awareness. While student involvement can be an incredible driving force around this issue, it’s important that campus administrators work collaboratively to guide and support their efforts. Here are ten tips to help you make the most of this collaboration.

1. Connect with Student Leaders

Reach out to activists, opinion leaders, and other influential students on campus. Determine who is engaged with different activities and events, and what their efforts entail. As necessary, introduce student leaders to one another to help them maximize their outcomes. Also consider sharing your aspirations regarding ending violence on your campus, engaging students as allies in your continued efforts throughout the year.

2. Support Student Leaders and Event Organizers

Play a hand in organizing events. Provide ways for students to partner with your office, share resources, and promote services. Consider hosting, sponsoring, or contributing to events—students will appreciate it. In turn, demonstrate your appreciation of student efforts. Positive recognition goes a long way!

3. Educate Student Leaders and Support Event Learning Outcomes

Train students on strategies for hosting a successful event, and best practices for prevention. Support students in considering educational outcomes and key messages for events that go beyond simply raising awareness. Enlist students to create materials to support intended outcomes.

4. Contribute (and Gather) Information

Offer talking points and statistics for students to utilize. Think about the messages that you want all students to be receiving, and share them with those students who will be helping with programs. Ensure that students know of available resources, are equipped with strategies for supporting survivors or overcoming resistance, and have a general understanding of university-wide efforts currently in place (or in the works). Create a feedback loop to incorporate new ideas and improve future efforts – this can be a fantastic learning process for students and professionals alike.

5. Focus on the Positives and Correct Misperceptions

Encourage framing messages around positive norms, emphasizing the promotion of healthy behaviors rather than focusing solely on preventing unhealthy ones. Misperceptions of social norms often exist among students, with a tendency to overestimate negative attitudes and behaviors of peers while underestimating the positive. Show students that they are part of a healthy majority on campus, and empower them to create the safe campus community they want to live and learn in.

6. Build Bridges and Connect the Dots

Demonstrate how events during Sexual Assault Awareness Month fit into the bigger picture of campus prevention. Find ways to connect these events with other prevention work happening on campus. You’ll likely have a captive audience – use it to generate momentum towards ongoing events throughout the year. This is also a great time to encourage other stakeholders to get involved.  Collaboration is key!

7. Be Present

Attend events being hosted by student groups. Bring materials and maintain visibility for your office at these events. Simply being there is an important demonstration of your accessibility, commitment, and support.

8. Be Mindful of Media

This is often a time during which media attention to the topic of sexual assault is heightened. Schools may be eager to showcase their efforts through student, local, or even national news, and this can be a great way of increasing awareness on a larger scale. That said, it is important to be respectful of survivors and their wishes. Events like “Take Back The Night” can be a profound experience for those who participate, and as such it is crucial that participants are informed if media will be present. If a media outlet has expressed an interest, connect with them beforehand to establish expectations and boundaries, inform students if there are events where media will be present, and consider writing an official statement that you can share to accurately convey your efforts.

9. Provide Follow-Up and Ongoing Support

Be aware that this can be a challenging and emotionally charged issue for students to take on, particularly if they have a personal connection to sexual assault. Provide opportunities for students to discuss their thoughts about the events, especially if efforts failed to meet their expectations. Validate any feelings that may arise from their involvement in programming, and remind them of available resources on campus should they need them.

10. Show Gratitude

Students quite often have a great deal on their plates. As such, when they volunteer their time and energy to raise awareness about this issue, they are likely doing so because of a true connection to it. Remind them that their involvement is valued and meaningful.  A hand-written thank you note, a follow-up email, or an end-of-month celebration for volunteers are all small gestures than can be incredibly meaningful.

EverFi at NASPA National 2016: Five Sessions on Preventing Campus Sexual Assault, Addressing Alcohol Abuse, and Promoting Wellness in Diverse Student Populations

We are proud to share that members of the EverFi Partner Education team will be presenting five sessions at the upcoming NASPA National Conference taking place in Indianapolis. From climate surveys to policy-driven windows of opportunity—and a whole host of unique student populations along the way—this year’s NASPA Conference highlights EverFi’s commitment to thought leadership and comprehensive prevention research.

If you will be attending NASPA, please check out the session information below. We hope you’ll consider attending one of our presentations! The EverFi team will also be available at booth #606 in the Exhibit Hall – we encourage you to stop by and connect with us, and check out some of the great materials we’ll have at our booth to support your work.

If you won’t be at NASPA this year, we’ll miss you. But please don’t hesitate to reach out if you’re interested in finding out more about the cutting-edge prevention research we’re doing and how we can support you further in the important work you do to keep your campuses thriving.

***EVERFI SESSIONS AT THE NASPA NATIONAL 2016 CONFERENCE*** 

Addressing Mission-Critical Institutional Priorities Using Campus Climate Surveys

Day/Time: Monday, March 14 (8:30 AM – 9:20 AM)

Location:  Meeting Room 136 – Convention Center

Presenters: Rob Buelow (EverFi), Kelley Adams (MIT)

Session Description: Sexual assault is widely prevalent yet vastly underreported, leaving campuses with incomplete information about the scope and nature of occurrence. As a result, administrators face significant challenges in providing adequate and effective services to prevent and respond to sexual assault. These deficiencies create ripples that impact all facets of our institutions from student wellness to retention. Presenters will provide important context about the merits of climate surveys and their value for achieving mission-critical priorities.

The Need for Collecting College-Specific Health Data of LGBTQ Students

Day/Time: Monday, March 14 (1:15 PM – 2:05 PM)

Location:  Meeting Room 136 – Convention Center

Presenters: Kimberley Timpf (EverFi), Sherri Darrow (University at Buffalo)

Session Description: A lack of data on the health of LGBTQ students means that colleges and universities are left to guess about protective and risk factors and health interventions for this population. The presenters will explore the implications of this challenge and discuss insights gathered as a result of adding sexual orientation and gender identity questions to national and campus-level surveys. Participants will be provided with resources to assist with the process of collecting similar data on their campus.

Shining a Light on Overlooked Student Populations for Sexual and Relationship Violence Prevention

Day/Time: Monday, March 14 (2:30 PM – 3:20 PM)

Location:  Meeting Room 138 – Convention Center

Presenters: Rob Buelow (EverFi), Holly Rider-Milkovich (University of Michigan)

Session Description: Presenters will explore primary and secondary research on the knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, experiences, and behaviors of often overlooked student populations, including graduate students, community and technical college students, and adult learners. The presenters will share experiential and data-driven insights on working with these students and describe the collaborative process of developing a unique approach to effectively provide prevention education to non-traditional student groups around sexual and relationship violence.

Addressing High-Risk Behaviors in Fraternities and Sororities: Evidence-based and Data-driven Prevention

Day/Time: Tuesday, March 15 (2:30 PM – 3:20 PM)

Location:  Meeting Room 138 – Convention Center

Presenters: Erin McClintock (EverFi), Nicole Cavallaro (EverFi)

Session Description: The presenter will review challenges facing campus and headquarters staff in addressing high-risk behaviors among fraternity and sorority members, providing a framework for developing effective prevention efforts. It will review data from in-course GreekLifeEdu surveys, reflecting attitudes, behaviors, and experiences of approximately 65,000 – 70,000 new members in 2015. This session aims to empower staff with effective approaches, to engage students in solutions, and to raise the profile of healthy and responsible Greek-affiliated students.

Leveraging the Current Regulatory Landscape to Support Broader Campus Prevention Initiatives

Day/Time: Tuesday, March 15 (2:30 PM – 3:20 PM)

Location:  Meeting Room 136 – Convention Center

Presenters: Kimberley Timpf (EverFi), Rob Buelow (EverFi)

Session Description: Heightened attention to campus sexual violence has student affairs leaders asking, “How can finite resources be allocated to appropriately address a growing set of mandates and responsibilities around this critical issue without losing focus on broader wellness and safety challenges?” The presenters will discuss cross-cutting public health frameworks and mission-critical priorities that can be leveraged to inspire collaborative efforts and insure we stay focused on doing the best work possible to address these interconnected issues.

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Denver Nuggets and Lt. Governor Joe Garcia Kick Off African-American History Program

“The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Last week, Colorado Lt. Governor Joe Garcia, a panel of players from the Denver Nuggets, and more than 80 students from West Leadership Academy in Denver gathered to celebrate the launch of EverFi’s 306: African-American History course this spring semester. The Nuggets are making this program available to all 9-12 graders, at no cost to the academy.

Lt. Governor Garcia kicked off the event by sharing personal anecdotes about the positive impact of his diverse upbringing and asked students to reflect on the importance of studying other cultures and learning shared values.

In its third year of operation, West Leadership Academy has a 95% minority enrollment, which includes a 91% hispanic student population. The school was built as part of an initiative to revive a neighboring school with the district’s lowest graduation rate and prepare students to be college-ready.

College-readiness is a central goal of Lt. Governor Garcia’s as well. In his remarks to students, he shared his mission to ensure that students of all backgrounds are equally represented and equally successful in higher education. He also urged students to seek help from their teachers and their community. “If you’re willing to put effort in, there are folks who want to help you be successful,” Garcia advised. “And I want to emphasize that if you’re struggling, these are some of the people who want to help you, so don’t be afraid to ask.”

Clearly, the West Leadership Academy students found common ground with Garcia. The Lt. Governor really resonated with me,” said student Luis Carrasco. “Knowing he is Latino and the position that he is in, that’s really motivating and makes us think that we can do it too.”

The NBA panel, comprised current and former Denver Nuggets players Randy Foye, Mark Randall, and Jameer Nelson, answered students’ questions about why multicultural education is so importan120_EverFiDenvert and provided advice on overcoming adversity and achieving personal goals. “Don’t be caught up in what you’re not,” challenged former NBA player Mark Randall. “Be caught up in what you are and what you can do.”

In the coming weeks, students at West Leadership Academy will be taking EverFi’s 306: African-American History course. They will learn stories and themes of African-American women and men who have overcome obstacles through grit, strength, creativity, and intellect. The kickoff event encouraged students to dive deeper into the course and draw inspiration from it’s great stories. To learn more about 306 and about bringing this diversity & inclusion program into your community, click here >

Bringing African-American History to Every School Across the State of Florida

As we approach 2016, multiculturalism in U.S. schools is taking on new a dimension. GenZ, ages 2-19, is the most diverse and multicultural of any generation in the U.S., and studies show that multicultural education is integral to improving academic achievement and preparing all students for success.

EverFi is thrilled to announce a partnership with the Florida Commissioner of Education to bring our 306: African-American History course to hundreds of schools across the state of Florida. The Commissioner of Education’s African-American History Task Force (AAHTF) is an advocate for multicultural studies in Florida’s school districts, teacher education training centers, and the community at large. Through the partnership, the AAHTF has mandated that all districts use EverFi’s 306: African-American History in order to achieve ‘exemplary status.’

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Geneva Gay. “The Importance of Multicultural Education”

Laden with imagery and sound, the 306 course is dynamic, immersive, and interactive. Students can take control of their own journey and travel through eras of African-American history at their own pace. The course is designed to address the skills and proficiencies outlined in the Core State Standards for writing and literacy in History and Social Studies. “EverFi’s 306 course is a great learning experience for my U.S. History students.  It brings African American History to life, and offers in depth knowledge on important African Americans and events that helped shape America. 306 is a fun, interactive program that allows students to make a personal connection to the people they are studying. Students come into class excited to tell me about the lessons and what they learned from the course,” said teacher Laura Rutherford, Logger’s Run Middle School in Boca Raton, Florida.

EverFi is excited to help districts and schools meet exemplary status, and our on-the-ground activation team has already begun training teachers across the state, including Hillsborough County, Alachua County, Miami-Dade County and Duval County.

Learn More:
306: African-American History Course > 
AAHTF Partnership > 

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EverFi & Arizona State Treasurer Host Financial Literacy Roundtable for Advocates in the State

Urgency to address a critical skills gap in K-12 financial education was the theme for a spirited discussion led by Arizona State Treasurer Jeff DeWit and EverFi. On August 12th, EverFi and Treasurer DeWit hosted a roundtable discussion with community leaders on the importance of financial education in the state of Arizona.

It is my goal to improve the financial knowledge of all Arizona students,” said Treasurer DeWit.  “It is critical that education leaders, business leaders, and technology innovators, like EverFi, continue to collaborate to reach more students with critical skills education.

During the 2014-15 school year, EverFi reached 113 Arizona schools through its financial literacy programs and served over 8,000 students.  Students increased their knowledge in financial literacy topics by 85% after completing the course and felt more prepared to make financial decisions on their own.IMG_2040

Many Arizona community leaders joined Treasurer DeWit for the event including Phoenix Union High School District, Paradise Valley, Scottsdale Unified, Dysart Unified, Arizona Department of Education, and Arizona Charter School Association.

Tony Camp, Director of Career and Technical Education (CTE) for the Phoenix Union High School District, talked about the district’s integration of EverFi’s courses and the benefits they have seen.  He also invited several CTE students from Trevor Browne High School to share their experience with the program.

Rudy Lima, a 12th grade student at Trevor Browne High School, shared that I am grateful to have been exposed to EverFi’s financial education course in high school.  Before, I wasn’t confident I knew enough about my own finances, but now I feel more prepared to make important financial decisions as I enter my adult life.  I would encourage other students and teachers across the state to get involved with EverFi’s programs.

A Phoenix Union High School District 11th grade student explained how the program helped her to learn about the FAFSA so she could apply for financial aid when she was ready to go to college.  All of the students in attendance have plans to go to college and stated that the program helped them to understand their financial options.

EverFi and Treasurer DeWit plan to work on a continuation plan to keep the group engaged and actively involved in the advancement of financial education in the state.  For more information about the roundtable or EverFi’s programs in Arizona, please contact Jessica Golden, Arizona Schools Manager, at jgolden@everfi.com.

 

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