With most of North America finally warming up from the snow and deep freeze of last week, now is the time to get our brains and bodies moving with our favorite winter sport– hockey! Images of ice skating on a frozen pond may come to mind for some of us educators, but for our students, we sometimes need to bring to life the connection between the kinetic and potential energy occurring when a frozen puck drops, building endurance to increase speed, and STEM!

Using Future Goals: Hockey Scholar online lessons alongside the premade labs provided in the EVERFI Teacher Dashboard can help keep students skating to their STEM goals! See how a few of our champion educators utilize these materials:

Hockey Scholar – Science Edition Online Lesson: Prepare the Surface

Student Lab: Water Displacement

Pittsburgh Public Schools
Pittsburgh Student Achievement Center

Introduce the lesson Prepare the Surface from the Hockey Scholar-Science Edition by asking students, “What sports are typically played during the winter season?”  After hearing a few responses, ask students to focus on basketball and hockey which can both be played indoors.  Ask students to think about how one night basketball can be played within the building and then the next night hockey.  While students are reflecting, bring up a picture of a local arena. Tell students that they are going to become ice technicians [yes, the people who drive the Zamboni!] to discover how this process is done. After students complete the Prepare the Surface lesson, plan your next class period to pair with the ‘Water Displacement’ lab to continue your discussion around volume for the ice rink dimensions.

Hockey Scholar – Science Edition Online Lesson: The Face Off

Student Lab: Frozen Pucks

West Jefferson Hills School District
McClellan Elementary

Anyone else have a difficult time as a student with understanding the difference between kinetic and potential energy?  With the science lesson, The Face Off, these abstract concepts can be visualized by taking on the role of a referee building anticipation amongst the players and fans by dropping the puck. Take kinetic and potential energy a step further by demonstrating how the temperature of the equipment in various sports affect potential and kinetic energy. Before starting the ‘Frozen Pucks’ lab, have the students think of a basketball that was left outside in the cold and ask, “Could you still play a game of pick up with a frozen ball?”

Hockey Scholar – Math Edition Online Lesson: Paint the Ice

Student Activity: Create Your Own Rink

Duquesne School District 
Duquesne Elementary  

Bring together the intersection of art, science, and sports during the math lesson, Paint the Ice. Preface this lesson with a review of the geometric shapes found in an arena by looking at a picture of the ice rink or even a basketball court. Tell students that precise measurements are extremely importance during any game and through this lesson, they will learn why!  After completing the online lesson, let students use their creativity to design their own ice rink using similar measurements.  Although not a lab found currently featured on the Teacher Resource Center, this ‘Create Your own Rink’ activity was completed by Duquesne Elementary in Pittsburgh, PA. Students demonstrated their understanding through project based learning, a perfect pair to the Paint the Ice digital lesson.  Now how does that paint not come off when skating over it?!

Alyssa Mahramus is a Schools Implementation Manager located in Pittsburgh, PA who supports schools, educators, and students around western and central PA fit EVERFI’s resources into their curriculum. Alyssa is a former educator of 8 years working in the Pittsburgh area and North Carolina. She enjoys rooting for everything black and gold, training for half-marathons, and running around with her dog Steve.