A Teacher’s Perspective On Financial Literacy

Almost a year ago, a colleague and I were fortunate to be able to attend an economics training at the Atlanta Federal Reserve. Our intent was to gain a few resources, spend a little time collaborating with other economics teachers in the Atlanta area, and above all, enjoy a wonderful breakfast and lunch. We came away having done all of that and with access to the Financial Literacy course available from EverFi.

8951436522_d04cc37846_mOur initial thoughts were to offer the course as a supplemental option for our students. As we reviewed our course schedule, we were able to incorporate several days in the computer lab and decided to make the Financial Literacy course our students’ final exam, which would be due following the End of Course Test (EOCT) in early December. We interspersed our days in the computer lab with review work in the classroom throughout November.

As our students worked through EverFi’s Financial Literacy course, we were floored by their comments. Consistently, our students told us that they loved what they were learning. One student even told my colleague, “This is the first actually useful thing I’ve learned in high school.” Although we hope that he was overstating that, we did observe a dramatic increase in EOCT scores in December with most of the increase in the International Trade and Personal Finance domain. Overall, our pass rate on the EOCT increased by three percent over the year before. The principal and administration were happy, but more than that, our students were excited about what they had learned. Spring semester, we planned to utilize EverFi again, and students reiterated the excitement we saw in the fall.

EverFi’s Financial Literacy program has been so well received by my students that I also planned and executed a professional development for our Social Studies department for several additional EverFi courses. Excitement is building with the teachers, and I am hopeful that we will see an increase in student engagement across all Social Studies classes. Students who are engaged in their learning through interactive simulations are remembering new concepts better, and the proof of that understanding can be found in their increased EOCT scores.

Leah Kurtz
EverFi Teacher
Kell High School, GA