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Financial Elder Abuse

Keeping Baby Boomers Financially Secure

How and why financial institutions can help

As the baby boomer population quickly becomes the largest senior demographic in American history, there is a growing concern about keeping their hard-earned investments safe. According to a recent report, the U.S. senior community loses an astonishing $53 billion annually to both fraudulent and deceptive practices.[1] This type of preying on the elderly is known as “elder financial abuse,” and financial institutions are in the perfect position to help. First, let’s look at the three types of financial elder abuse:

  • Financial Exploitation
    This type of exploitation is legal but highly unethical, and consists of deceiving or convincing seniors to make poor financial decisions or give their money away.
  • Criminal Fraud
    This type of activity is clearly illegal, and includes identity theft and mail fraud.
  • Caregiver Abuse
    This refers to financial theft or deception by someone trusted—whether it be a family member, healthcare worker, or even a financial manager.

How banks and credit unions can help

As institutions that have built long-term relationships with seniors and their children, banks and credit unions are perfectly positioned to help stem the tide of financial elder abuse. But how to do so? Financial education is a big part of the solution. Both elders and their caregivers feel confident that the information they receive from their bank or credit union is both honest and understandable—but getting the information to them can be a challenge.

In the digital age, where some seniors may be housebound but accustomed to surfing the Web, while others might feel more comfortable visiting their local branch, financial education must be a two-pronged approach. The first prong includes providing digital programming that can be accessed by boomers and their children—anywhere, anytime. The second prong focuses on the branch level, and includes training employees and providing relevant print materials. As the baby boomers age, the problem of financial elder abuse is not going to go away.

[1] Study: The True Link Report on Elder Financial Abuse 2015 Executive Summary. (January, 2015). Retrieved January 20, 2017, from https://www.truelinkfinancial.com/news/true-link-releases-latest-elder-financial-abuse-findings-losses-discovered-to-be-much-worse-than-originally-thought

Financial Education Program Online

4 Elements of an Effective Financial Education Program

Young Adult at Computer

Recent studies have shown that young people are growing up without adequate financial education, and banks, credit unions, and employers have been stepping in to fill this gap. But as a corporation or financial institution, how can you be sure that the financial education program you choose is an effective one? Fortunately, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has laid out guidelines for what makes an effective financial education program.[1] Here’s what to look for:

  1. Content
    How strong is the content of the program, and what topics does the program cover? Ideally, a financial education program should cover a wide range of topics, including spending, saving, investing, credit, and money management. Also look for programs that speak to different life stages and employ age-appropriate methods and technologies.
  2. Utility
    Is the program easy to use—for both students and administrators? Is it available in other languages? Look for programs that can be accessed by multiple demographics and age groups, and on a range of devices, including computers, phones, and tablets.
  3. Quality
    Explore the quality of the program. How deep is the subject matter? Where are the facts coming from? And is it based on the most recent research in the field?
  4. Efficacy
    Perhaps most importantly, how do you know that the program is effective? A reputable financial education program should be able to demonstrate that students’ knowledge increases after taking the course. Look for programs that not only measure and document student progress, but also can show success after doing so in the past.

There are many financial education programs available in the marketplace, but not all of them are created equal. When you’re evaluating a new program, these four critical elements will ensure that you’re getting your money’s worth.

[1] Report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: Youth Financial Education Curriculum Review. (October 2015). Retrieved January 27, 2017, from http://files.consumerfinance.gov/f/201509_cfpb_youth-financialeducation-curriculum-review.pdf

Financial Education in Elementary School

Financial Education for Younger Kids

As financial institutions and employers watch the twenty-something generation struggle with money matters, there has been much talk about the importance of financial education for young people. But how young should you start?

A recent report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) offers compelling reasons for starting financial literacy education for children as early as elementary school.[1] According to the report, childhood financial attitudes, habits, and norms begin to develop between ages 6-12. Teaching children heathy money habits at this age can have lasting effects, setting them up for a lifetime of financial success. In specific, CFPB recommends focusing on two primary areas in elementary school:

  1. Financial Habits and Norms
    We already know that children learn social and cultural behaviors at a young age, by observing the behaviors and attitudes of the people around them. According to the CFPB, financial behavior is no different. The report argues that “the values, standards, routine practices, and rules of thumb used to routinely navigate our day-to-day financial lives” can—and should—also be taught to young children. In practical terms, this means that children who are exposed to healthy financial habits at a young age tend to grow up to be adults who also have healthy financial habits.
  2. Financial Knowledge and Decision-Making Skills
    Beyond socialization, kids also have the ability to start learning concrete financial skills at a young age. The CFPB notes that “skillful money management, financial planning, goal setting, and financial research” are among the hands-on skills that must be taught in order for children to have a healthy financial foundation. For example, teaching elementary-aged kids about saving money, managing a basic budget, comparison shopping, and setting money goals are skills that will last a lifetime, and will give them the financial confidence and knowledge needed to grasp more complex financial topics at a later age.

The financial world that our children will inherit is an increasingly complex one. In an age of online shopping, digital payments, global trading, and sometimes deceptive lending, we need to set up our children for success—and this means teaching them solid financial habits and skills at a young age. To learn more about family financial capability and examine how it can help inform your consumer financial education solutions download our guide.

 

[1]Study from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: Building blocks to help youth achieve financial capability. (September 2016). Retrieved January 27, 2017, from https://s3.amazonaws.com/files.consumerfinance.gov/f/documents/092016_cfpb_BuildingBlocksReport_ModelAndRecommendations_web.pdf

Join our webinar June 7th 1PM

Financial Education as a Digital Marketing Tool

Join our webinar June 7th 1PM

Join our webinar on June 7th 1PM EST to learn about how you can leverage financial education.

Four Reasons Why Financial Institutions Should be Paying Attention to Financial Education

Increasingly, financial institutions are leveraging digital financial education to market products and services to a highly targeted and responsive audience. In fact, a recent EverFi survey found that 89 percent of banks and credit unions are already using financial education as a part of their digital marketing strategy, while 45 percent are planning to increase their budget in this area. If you’re not investing in financial education as a digital marketing tool, here are four reasons why you should be:

  1. Consumers interested in financial education are hot leads
    Consumers who are seeking out financial education are already expressing interest in financial services—meaning they have “self-selected” as hot leads. By offering valuable, reliable information, banks and credit unions are positioning themselves as trusted sources of information, and are perfectly positioned to (very selectively) pitch relevant products and services.
  2. Financial education offers highly segmented audiences
    Offering digital financial education programs tailored to different topics and life stages allows banks and credit unions to segment this audience even further. For instance, a young Millennial learning about student loans might also be interested in an auto loan for their first car, while a mid-career earner researching retirement plans might be interested in learning about other investments.
  3. Going digital means accessing your audience anywhere, anytime
    Providing online financial education programming allows your institution an unprecedented reach—banks and credit unions can access their audience anywhere, anytime—via mobile phones, laptops, tablets, and other devices.
  4. Everyone else is doing it
    We’ve already learned that 89 percent of all financial institutions already provide online financial education. With that in mind, the most compelling argument for investing in this marketing tool might be that if you aren’t offering it, your customers will quickly find someone else who is.

Bottom line? In today’s on-demand digital world, if your marketing plan does not include digital financial education, you’re missing out on the chance to both attract and retain customers. For more information on how to leverage financial education for marketing, join our webinar June 7th at 1PM EST.

University of Kentucky Federal Credit Union Case Study

UKFCU: Boosting Member Financial Wellness with Digital Financial Education

As a member-owned financial cooperative, the University of Kentucky Federal Credit Union has an especially vested interest in their members’ financial decision making. Understanding that financial education technology could make a big difference for their members, they tapped into EverFi’s expertise to design digital financial education courses and implement a large-scale outreach initiative.

How the U. of Kentucky Credit Union launched an incentivized digital financial education program that boosted engagement and promoted auto loan sales.

Download EverFi’s case study, Driving Member Wellness Through Online Education: The University of Kentucky Federal Credit Union

With EverFi’s digital financial education training modules, the University of Kentucky Federal Credit Union was able to offer accessible financial education without taxing their limited staff resources. And, as an incentive for members to participate, they decided to offer a quarter-point interest rate discount on a new auto loan for any member who completed four training modules. This reward not only boosted participation, but it also had the added bonus of helping to promote auto loan sales.

The program proved to be hugely successful, with more than a third of the visitors to the credit union’s website taking time to engage with the auto loan discount program. Among members who registered for the program, 87 percent completed at least one module, with 37 percent completing the entire program.

The online education content has also helped the University of Kentucky Federal Credit Union improve their digital presence and connect with hard-to-reach millennial members. Thanks to their partnership with EverFi, they’ve found a solution to member financial wellness where truly everyone wins.

To learn more about how the University of Kentucky improved member financial wellness and their digital financial marketing strategy with EverFi, read Driving Member Wellness Through Online Education: The University of Kentucky Federal Credit Union.